South Sudan, Mingkamam (Lakes State), 4 April 2014



Working with NGO partners in the country, WFP has reached more than 502,000 people affected by the conflict and is expanding assistance each day to reach more people in need of support. WFP plans to assist an additional 275,000 in the next month through the use of a combination of airdrops, airlifts and river transport.


Mobile distribution teams are being deployed in remote, hard-to-reach areas in order to support the crisis response.  The teams now include staff from other UN agencies including UNICEF, and in the coming weeks will be expanded to include FAO and NGO partners.  Teams are currently in the field providing food assistance in Akobo (Jonglei State), Nyal and Mayendit (Unity State) and Kodok (Upper Nile). WFP mobile teams have previously distributed assistance to some 85,000 conflict-affected people in five locations: Ganyiel (Unity State), Old Fangak, Lankien and Pibor (Jonglei State) and Nassir County (Upper Nile State.)
 


WFP continues to assist people sheltering in UN compounds and other IDP populations. More than 67,000 people are sheltering in UN compounds.
 WFP is facing serious challenges in transporting food to deep field locations due to access and security concerns. This is hampering our annual pre-positioning exercise, in which we stock up warehouses in areas that will become inaccessible when the rains start in April/May. 
Despite immense challenges due to insecurity, including looting and commandeering of trucks belonging to commercial transporters contracted by WFP, we have dispatched more than 41,000 metric tons of food around the country since the start of the year.




In the photos:  as WFP extends its activities to reach more and more people affected by the conflict in remote areas of South Sudan, it is also continuing to assist tens of thousands people sheltering in Mingkamam, where WFP has been providing food assistance since December.


Mingkamam in the Lakes State hosts about 85,000 internally displaced people. Many of them used boats to cross the White Nile from Bor in neighbouring Jonglei State to find safety in Mingkamam, which is in Awerial County.



Photos: WFP/Giulio d’Adamo


Central African Republic 30 March 2014

 With continuing violence, massive displacement and the near-collapse of its economy, Central African Republic is on the brink of a humanitarian catastrophe and urgently needs international assistance.

The rainy season has started earlier this year; most roads will soon be impassable and thousands of people needing assistance will be out of reach. WFP requires support now to preposition food rations. US$54.8 million is urgently needed to continue operations to the end of August. The steady escalation of tension in Bangui and in the provinces poses a growing threat to humanitarian staff and convoys. Despite persistent insecurity and irregular road supplies. WFP distributed food aid to an average of over 250,000 people each month since the start of the year. The number of displaced people in the capital is beginning to decrease. Since late February, some 50,000 people have left various sites. As of 1 April, according to OCHA, more than 207,000 displaced people remained in Bangui. The current estimate of the number of displaced people in the entire country stands at 625,000 with a further 300,000 people having fled to neighboring countries. WFP and its partners expect increased deaths of children under age five and growing child and adult malnutrition due to conflict, the rains, spreading disease because of poor sanitation, the onset of the lean season and the poor food security situation. This is on top of the pre-conflict nutrition situation, in which half of all children in C.A.R. were stunted and 25 percent were underweight.

 C.A.R. faces a deepening food and nutrition emergency and a country-wide economic crisis due to a combination of negative factors.

 
In the photos:

An orphanage run by Madame Gilberte Wadji. 

At the peak of the crisis, in December 2013, more than 100 IDPs took temporary shelter in the orphanage being located in the safer side of the city. When things seemed to calm down the IDPs left to the larger camps to reunite with parts of their families with whom they had lost contact during the clashes.
Madame Gilberte opened the orphanage in 2007, and the structure used to rely nearly exclusively on private donations but due to the crisis she has understood that her reliance on this was not possible any longer and in fact in February 2014 WFP started supporting the orphanage by providing it with an initial three month ration of rice, oil, SuperCereal, pulses and salt. 
Before the crisis the orphanage hosted 30 children, since then six children affected directly by the conflict have been taken in so now there are 36 children inside and 7 more are on the waiting list to join and in reality waiting until Mme. Gilbert finds the resources to build the additional beds needed. 

As well as running the orphanage Madame Gilberte and her collaborators support an additional 155 orphans that are staying with foster families in the various IDP camps within Bangui,  the orphanage assists these children by covering some of the school fees and offering them daily meals. The orphanage provides mostly for Christian children but is open to children from both sides and the children assisted in the camps are both Christian and Muslim children in respective camps. A volunteer psychologist comes to visit the children from time to time and doctors from MSF also visit the structure on a regular basis. 

Some of the children in the orphanage have been abandoned. These kids arrived at the orphanage without a full name. Madame Gilberte Wadji gives all of these children her own surname so that when children like Anne-Sophie (4) and Emanuel (7) who were found in the trash at different times in different places when they were tiny babies were taken to the orphanage and now have the same surname. 
Naomi (11) instead simply walked into the orphanage by herself to two weeks ago.  She was already an orphan before the crisis, but she was living with her aunt in PK5 neighborhoods. During clashes, she got separated from her aunt and ended up in the mostly -Christian St. Saveur IDP camp. There, a woman took care of her and changed her original Muslim name, Samira, into Naomi.



 All photos: WFP/Rein Skullerud

South Sudan: South Sudanese Need Food And Peace

The ongoing conflict in South Sudan is uprooting families and paralysing the food markets they depend on. Thousands are forced to flee their homes.

A joint report by the World Food Programme (WFP) and the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) found that the States most affected by the conflict (Jonglei, Upper Nile and Unity) were also the most food insecure prior to the conflict. These are also the areas with the highest deficits in cereal production — large amounts must be trucked in to supply markets. Even in good times, people in these states spend most of their income on food.

 “The crisis is hurting food security in South Sudan in part because of disruption to trade routes and food markets. WFP will continue using airdrops and airlifts, as well as land transport using trucks, to get food supplies to the displaced people.”

We have provided lifesaving food assistance and nutrition support to nearly 800,000 people in South Sudan since the crisis began in mid-December, including more than 450,000 people displaced or directly affected by the conflict. Food assistance has also gone to another 335,000 people enrolled in existing projects for refugees or other vulnerable groups. The goal is to scale up assistance to support 2.5 million people in South Sudan over the coming months.

All photos Tongping IDP camp: WFP/Giulio d’Adamo

Article excerpt from: wfp.org

Full article: http://www.wfp.org/stories/south-sudan-hunger-mounts-conflict-disrupts-markets

Central African Republic, 27 March 2014



Ali Mohamat has mixed Chadian/Central African origins. His mother at the outset of the crisis and one of his wives fled to Chad. His father and his children were killed by anti-Balaka militias in PK12 in December. His second wife is with him in PK5, she is 15.

"I fled Sahara Neighbourhood and I have been here since 5 December. I had 3 children 7, 5 and 2 year old and they were all killed. Since we came here we have only had WFP rations to eat. I want to leave CAR and go to Chad to join part of my family that is already there. However, they are also experiencing food access problems as they are not in camps but they rented a house in Malfi. The security situation is desperate, there is too much hatred towards the Muslim community. Before March 2013 I was a trader. My ancestors turned Bangui from bush into the city that it is today, but the Christians are now taking over and chasing us away."



1st Photo: Ali and his second wife in the house.

2nd Photo: Ali’s brother’s daughter and his second wife.

3rd Photo: Ashta Adam Ali’s second wife cooking food.

4th Photo: Ali’ brother’s daughter Abiba. His brother was killed and he now he takes care of her.

All Photos: WFP/Rein Skullerud (@ReinSkullerud)

Please donate here: https://give.wfp.org/635/?step=country&lead_source=2014-wfp-car-hp&form_tag=2014-wfp-car-hp

The Central African Republic is on the brink of a humanitarian catastrophe as violence forces more and more people to flee their homes and the national economy edges towards collapse. With local food systems breaking down, WFP and its partners are seeing cases of malnutrition multiply.

Central Africa Republic, Bangui, February 2014

Since mid-February WFP provides extra children rations (Plumpy Sup, Plumpy Doz, Super Cereals Plus) in general food distributions so kids fight malnutrition and keep smiling. Hundreds of children have been diagnosed with moderate or severe malnutrition around sites sheltering people displaced by violence in Bangui.



 

Photo one:

Larissa and her baby, Brenda Alafei, are from the Christian camp, where there were 45.000 people in September 2013.

Photo: WFP/Melissa Chemam

 

Photo two:

A Danish Refugee Council emergency monitor explaining to a group of displaced people what food WFP will be distributing at Don Bosco IDP camp.



Photo: WFP/Melissa Chemam

 

Photo three:

Juanita (3 year old) eats Plumpy Doz from her mother’s spoon. The supplement will help her fight malnutrition and keep away from disease. 



Photo: WFP/Alexis Masciarelli

 

Photo four:

A young mother holding her malnourished child at Don Bosco Church IDP camp


Photo: WFP/Melissa Chemam

 

Photo five:

The community living in PK12 found shelter here after fleeing violence in Bangui or in towns from the interior of CAR. There are many children, women and elderly.



Photo: WFP/Alexis Masciarelli

 

Photo six:

IDP women preparing Super Cereals Plus for the first time.



Photo: WFP/Alexis Masciarelli

The World Food Programme (WFP) is providing life-saving assistance to many displaced Syrians as the conflict enters its fourth year.

 

Photo one:

Homs, Syria, September 2012

 WFP is providing food assistance to over 223,000 people this month through its implementing partner the Syrian Arab Red Crescent and a local NGO – El Bir Association for Charity.
WFP is prioritising assistance to internally displaced people in public shelters mainly mosques, churches, schools as well as families displaced from one part of the governorate to another area taking refuge with relatives and friends.
Communities provide cooked meals to internally displaced people in public shelters using WFP dry rations.



 Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa

Photo two:

Jaramana, Syria , 19 September 2013

 This distribution is an emergency SARC response to assist newly arriving IDP’s mainly from Ma’aloula town, and Joubar.
This initiative take place in Jaramana town,  near to Damascu.
Is not only a food distribution, it’s a goods distribution such as hygienic kit, blankets, everything that people needs more.  

In the photo:  Kids of a family from Joubar  (Abo Mohammed family).



 Photo: WFP/Hussam Alsaleh

Photo three:

Syria, Al Tanaya village Adra (rural Damascus), 3 December 2013



 Fatema, 24 years old - displaced with her family from Douma in rural Damascus to Adra - feeding her 18 month old daughter Haneen lunch.

 Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa




Photo four:

 Takiya, Lebanon, 13 June 2013

Most of the 450,000 Syrian refugees in Lebanon are scattered in villages throughout the country. WFP provides food vouchers to these refugees who are living with host communities. The food vouchers are used when food is available in the market but people do not have enough money to buy it. As people buy in local shops, they also boost the local economy. The food vouchers are equivalent to US$34/person/month. In the month of June they injected more than $12 million into the Lebanese economy.  

Needs assessments showed that food was a top priority for the refugees and  is scaling up to provide food assistance to as many as 750,000 people by mid-2013.

In the photo: These are vouchers that can be used by Syrian refugees in the supermarkets to buy food.

 Photo: WFP/Jean-Philippe Chauzy

Photo five:

Lebanon, 7 November 2012

 

WFP Executive Director Ertharin Cousin talking to a Syrian refugee in her temporary house. This woman benefits form the WFP voucher programme that allows her to purchase what she needs directly from the supermarket.

 Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa

Photo six:

 Jordan, Zaatari Refugee Camp, 16 April 2013

 

Humanitarian needs, especially food, are growing across Syria as shortages of bread and fuel set in and countless families are displaced. WFP is reaching about 1.5 million people monthly in Syria and, as thousands more Syrians pour into neighbouring countries, we are also responding to the needs of refugees in Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, and Turkey. The ongoing political and security crisis in Syria has led to a deterioration in the country’s socio-economic conditions, particularly food security. Since March 2011, thousands of Syrians have crossed into Jordan to seek a safe haven. Many of these refugees are in need of humanitarian assistance, including food and shelter. Prices of commodities are higher in Jordan than Syria, limiting the purchasing power of Syrian refugees in Jordan. As of 15 January 2013, more than 134,000 Syrians were registered with the UN Refugee UNHCR, while over 51,000 are awaiting registration. The majority of the Syrian refugees in Jordan are hosted by local communities in urban areas. Others are hosted in refugee camps such as the Zaatari camp. According to the Government of Jordan, more than 300,000 Syrians have entered the country.

With over 100,000 Syrian refugees living in al Zaatari camp in northern Jordan and thousands of tents that provide accommodation to refugees in Zaatari camp. There are two schools in Zaatari camp one of them is run by WFP’s partner agency Unicef. WFP provides snacks for children who come to class since starting at the camp school in October last year, when the classes were still n tents. When in school at around 11.30, just as the class’s concentration starts to waver and stomachs begin rumbling, children are given a nutritious snack. It’s a date bar, fortified with vitamins and minerals, supplied by WFP.
Most children eat their date bars immediately. Many parents are keen to ensure their children’s education doesn’t suffer as a result of them being refugees. School is also important in the camp because it helps create a sense of normality, a feeling that life carries on.
Around 5,000 children receive WFP snacks in school every day in Zaatari. Funding permitting, the plan is to expand the programme further by the end of the year.

Sami (husband) and Sahar (wife) fled from Daraa in southern Syria and, after staying for a time in Amman and Egypt, they all arrived in al Zaatari refugee camp in March 2013. They have 10 children, the last of which was born in Zaatari only three weeks ago. Sami was a lawyer in Syria and fairly wealthy. He heads a committee of refugees in the camp. The family receives a ration of fresh bread every day along with the standard WFP dry rations (rice, lentils, bulgar wheat, pasta, salt, oil), which they can cook for themselves. Four of their children (Mohamed, Mahmoud, Ahmed and Rawan) go to one of the schools in al Zaatari and receive WFP datebars  as a mid-morning snack.
The ‘Bahraini’ school in al Zaatari is one of the two schools in the camp, both of which provide WFP datebars (containing vitamins and minerals) to children as a nutritious mid-morning snack. The programme started with 7,500 children in March 2013 and aimed to reach 30,000 children in school by end of 2013.

 Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud

Photo seven:

 Jordan, Zaatari Refugee Camp, 15 April 2013



 Humanitarian needs, especially food, are growing across Syria as shortages of bread and fuel set in and countless families are displaced. WFP is reaching about 1.5 million people monthly in Syria and, as thousands more Syrians pour into neighbouring countries, we are also responding to the needs of refugees in Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, and Turkey. The ongoing political and security crisis in Syria has led to a deterioration in the country’s socio-economic conditions, particularly food security. Since March 2011, thousands of Syrians have crossed into Jordan to seek a safe haven. Many of these refugees are in need of humanitarian assistance, including food and shelter. Prices of commodities are higher in Jordan than Syria, limiting the purchasing power of Syrian refugees in Jordan. As of 15 January 2013, more than 134,000 Syrians were registered with the UN Refugee UNHCR, while over 51,000 are awaiting registration. Most of the Syrian refugees in Jordan are hosted by local communities in urban areas. Others are hosted in refugee camps such as the Zaatari camp. According to the Government of Jordan, more than 300,000 Syrians have entered the country.

Every day before the sun comes up, three trucks from WFP’s contracted bakeries ‘Jawad’ and ‘Luminus’ begin their journey in the darkness to deliver 17.5 tons of freshly baked bread to feed the entire population of Syrian refugees in Zaatari Camp, Jordan. (To put this into perspective, this is equivalent of more than 100 twenty-foot containers full of bread stacked on top of each other every month).  

Alaa, six years old, one of over 100,000 Syrian refugees living in al Zaatari camp in northern Jordan. Thousands of tents that provide accommodation to refugees in Zaatari camp. It’s in the first area of the camp to be settled, because Alaa’s family came 9 months ago, not long after the camp was built.
Alaa’s family fled nine months ago when fighting intensified and they started hearing stories of children being kidnapped and maltreated. Her Mother Manal says they fled Homs with two suitcases and clothes for 10 days. Her main regret is leaving behind Alaa’s favorite toy, a doll that she used to dress and give baths. Manal cooks as best she can in tent’s kitchen area, using the food supplies provided by WFP along with a few other items, such as coffee, that she manages to find in Zaatari camp. Her home in Homs had a very well equipped kitchen, she says. There are two schools in Zaatari camp. Alaa and her sister go to one of them, which is run by WFP’s partner agency Unicef. WFP provides snacks for children who come to class. Alaa is in 1st grade and seems to have settled in well since starting at the camp school in October last year, when the classes were in tents. Although she doesn’t have her old friends from Homs, Alaa has made new friends at the school. When in school at around 11.30, just as the class’s concentration starts to waver and stomachs begin rumbling, children are given a nutritious snack. It’s a date bar, fortified with vitamins and minerals, supplied by WFP.
Most children eat their date bars immediately. But Alaa likes to take hers home, to eat in the early afternoon with her mother. Alaa’s parents are keen to ensure their daughter’s education doesn’t suffer as a result of them being refugees. School is also important in the camp because it helps create a sense of normality, a feeling that life carries on.
Alaa is one of around 5,000 children who receive WFP snacks in school every day in Zaatari. Funding permitting, the plan is to expand the programme further by the end of the year. 




Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud

International Women’s Day 2014

WFP Empowers women to end hunger

Bangladesh 15 May 2013

WFP engages ultra poor rural women and men in the planning and building of assets that increase their communities’ resilience to natural disasters and the effects of climate change and strengthen their agricultural production. WFP also provides training on disaster risk reduction, climate change adaptation as well as hygiene, sanitation and nutrition. Over the course of two years the participants, more than 70 percent of whom are women, receive food and cash for the work invested in community assets during the dry season and their participation in training during the rainy season.
In a third programme year, women from participating households are trained on developing a small business and receive a cash grant for investment as well as a monthly cash transfer. The monthly payment allows them to focus on growing their investment and increase their families’ economic resilience, food security and nutrition in the long term.

In the photo: a smiling portrait of Minoti Gain at work.

In the photo: Mina Mondol, a forty years old beneficiary, in a smiling portrait.



Photos one and two: WFP/Ranak Martin

Burkina Faso, Dori 1st October 2012


Targeted Food Assistance, Sebba, Sahel Region

In collaboration with the national partner Croix Rouge Burkina WFP implements this Targeted Food Assistance project in the framework of the protracted relief and recovery operation (PRRO), The project is implemented to assist the most vulnerable populations during the lean season from July to October. These kinds of projects are co-funded by EU member’s states, the EC or ECHO and are divided into Food and Cash deliveries; food is provided in the three most food insecure regions (including the Sahel Region) where WFP assists the vulnerable households with 38.5 kg of food commodities.

WFP specially provides support to women and young mothers to ensure that their children are adequately nourished and can grow healthy. 



Photo three: WFP/Rein Skullerud

Ethiopia, 4 July 2013 Sheddar Somali Refugee Camp (Jijiga), Somali region, 



WFP and ECHO cash distributions to Somali refugees in Ethiopia


The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) has launched its first cash distributions to refugees in Ethiopia this month, with the financial support of the European Commission Humanitarian Aid Office (ECHO).
More than 12,000 refugees started receiving monthly cash entitlements last week in addition to a monthly food allocation. This is a pilot project starting in the Sheddar refugee camp in the Somali regional state capital of Jijiga.
“Our main aim is to find the best way to meet refugee needs,” said Dr. Johan Heffinck from ECHO Ethiopia. “Providing cash directly to people can be more effective, as well as empowering for the refugees, since it allows them decide for themselves what their families need most.”
WFP’s food assistance to vulnerable communities (especially women and young mothers) has traditionally  been provided in the form of food rations. However, when conditions are right and the local market is responsive enough, WFP can use different tools such as cash or vouchers, which give people more choice and also benefit the local economy.
“The cash allows refugees to have more control in diversifying their diets, and they can buy milk, vegetables or pasta directly from the local market,” said Abdou Dieng, WFP Country Director in Ethiopia.
“The initiative has been made possible thanks to excellent partnerships,” Mr Dieng added, highlighting the collaboration between the Government of Ethiopia, , UNHCR and ECHO who funded the project with a contribution of 1 million Euros (USD 1,3 million).
Refugees at Sheddar camp receive a monthly ration of 13.9 kilograms of food, including wheat, rice, pulses, corn-soya blend, oil, sugar and salt, as well as a cash allocation of 100 Ethiopian Birr (US$5) per person.
About 13,000 additional refugees will start receiving cash in the same region in October.

In the Photo, Ms. Zemzem Mohammed Musse.

“I arrived here in 2008 with my 8 children.  My husband left me in fear of clan conflict when we were in Somalia.  I had to flee to Ethiopia.  It took me 7 days and 7 nights to reach here in this camp.  I have been receiving food and shelter.  I cannot express my happiness that cash is also added to the assistance we are being given.  With the money I received I bought all these food items, (ie onion, spaghetti, pepper, washing powder, etc.) Now I will also be able to pay back my debts. There seems to be no peace in Somalia in all four directions and we are hoping that the donor community does its best to find a permanent settlement for us in some other country.” She said.



Photo four: WFP/Giulio d’Adamo

Cambodia, Kampong Speu, Tanoun Village, 28 March 2012

 WFP has been in Cambodia since 1979, and has acquired significant knowledge of household food security, accumulated extensive field experience and developed strong relationships with the Government and a range of other cooperating partners. These comparative advantages are complemented with reliable resource supply chains and solid knowledge of food markets.
The food-for-work (FFW) activities beginning in the mid-1990s have built and rehabilitated rural community infrastructure, including over 10,000 km of feeder roads, more than a third of the national tertiary road network. WFP has also developed standards, work norms and management tools now used by the Government and other agencies for labour-intensive community works programmes. A 2010 FFW appraisal mission confirmed that WFP interventions functioned as a safety net and strengthened communities’ resilience to shocks through asset creation. The Country Programme foresees that the FFA interventions will provide off-season labour opportunities for food-insecure households to participate in creating community assets. Through a participatory process, communities will select assets that help generate higher agricultural productivity, increased access to markets and social infrastructure, and improved resilience to climate shocks. Community assets may include tertiary feeder roads, irrigation canals, small dams and dykes, fish ponds and trees.

A Cambodian woman working during an irrigation canal construction at Tanoun Village, Por Mreal Commune in Boseth District of Kampong Speu province.

 Cambodian Chey Serm, 63, pauses during work during fish pond construction project at Tanoun Village, Por Mreal Commune in Boseth District of Kampong Speu province.



Photos five and six: WFP/David Longstreath

Mali 4 October 2012 Diancounte Camara village in Kayes region.


Severe drought caused by failure and uneven distribution of rainfall and prolonged dry spells in 2011 led to a delayed planting season, resulting in a sharp drop in agricultural production and reduced food availability. About 4.6 million people are currently estimated to be at risk of food insecurity in Mali due to the food and nutritional crisis and the crisis in the North. The numbers of Internally displaced persons (IDPs), due to conflict, are rising WFP is intervening in the eight regions of Mali with the implementation of food assistance, nutritional and resilience building interventions. 
Nutrition activities include the Prevention of moderate acute malnutrition for children 6-23 months. Beneficiary children receive Plumpy’Sup (46g/day) for 250 kcal/pers/day.
Prevention of moderate acute malnutrition for pregnant and lactating women. Beneficiary women receive oil (20g/day) and supercereal (250/day for ) for 1,200 kcal/pers/day.
Treatment of moderate acute malnutrition for children 6-59 months. Beneficiary children receive Plumpy’Sup (92g/day) for 500 kcal/pers/day.
Treatment of moderate acute malnutrition for pregnant and lactating women. Beneficiary women receive oil (20g/day) and supercereal (250/day) for 1,200 kcal/pers/day.
Overall, WFP in Mali aims to reach 229,250 beneficiaries trough prevention of moderate acute malnutrition for children 6-23 months and for pregnant and lactating women (PLW) and 93,220 beneficiaries for treatment of moderate acute malnutrition children 6-59 months and PLW.

Photo seven: WFP/Rein Skullerud

Jaramana Refugee Camp, Syria, 18 December 2013



Thousands of Syrians continue to move from one place to another seeking nothing but safety for themselves and their loved ones. Many of them are left homeless, jobless and in fear of losing even their hope for a peaceful future.
Access to basic needs including food, water, electricity and medical supplies has been interrupted in areas witnessing armed activities. WFP √ê in partnership with the Syrian Arab Red Crescent (SARC) and 23 other local organizations√ê is providing food assistance to Syrian refugees.
Hundreds of thousands of families have fled the violence in their country and have taken refuge in Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Turkey and Egypt. Humanitarian needs assessments in these countries showed that food is a top priority and WFP is responding to refugees√ï needs with food distributions and innovative food vouchers.

In the photo: Nesrine’s daughter helped her flee from Eastern Ghouta to a safe haven in rural Damascus, a difficult journey for a woman of her age. She currently lives in a collective shelter internally displaced families where a local NGO uses WFP food rations to prepare hot meals every week.



Photo eight: WFP/Dina Elkassaby

 

Peru, February 2008



A mother and her small toddler Ayacucho, located in the andean highlands of Peru, pose as a picture of  is taken of them.
Ayacucho is one of the  departments where WFP implements development project “Promotion of Sustainable Development of Andean Microwatersheds”.

The project aims to protect livelihoods in crisis situations, enhance resilience to shocks and improve the nutrition and health of vulnerable groups of women and children (WFP Strategic Objectives 2, 3, 4) in the Country´s poorest departments(Ayacucho, Apurimac, Huancavelica,) and marginalized areas in Lima.
It contributes to the sustainable socioeconomic development of Andean watershed rural communities and improves living conditions of poor families through five components: agriculture/school infrastructure (FFW), literacy/nutritional education(FFT), MCH and HIV/AIDS. FFW activities seek to raise income levels of smallscale farmers through agriculture related training and by improving school infrastructures. 
The nutrition component (FFT) is directed at improving women´s knowledge, attitudes and practices in hygiene, health and nutrition. Through the literacy programme (FFT) female participation and decision-making abilities are enhanced. The HIV/AIDS component supports individuals with a balanced ration to improve their health and increase their knowledge in prevention and nutrition through training sessions.

 

Photo nine: WFP/Victor Mendoza

 

Zambia Luangua, April 2008



Veronica Band, is the head of a family of 16 members. She does not have any children of her own but feeds other 10 children. She joined COMACO and began growing organic cotton, nuts, maize and cassava very successfully through the assistance provided by WFP and its implementing partner COMACO that stands for Community Markets for Conservation (COMACO). 
COMACO promotes income generation, biodiversity conservation, and food security in Zambia’s Luangwa Valley. The organization links more than 40,000 rural households with lucrative and sustainable livelihood options, encourages methods for improving agricultural outputs through “conservation farming”, and provides access to markets.



Photo ten:WFP/Rein Skullerud

Uganda, February 2014

The dream of independence in the new country of South Sudan was shattered with the outbreak of fierce fighting in mid-December 2013. Tens of thousands of people fled to safety in neighboring countries, particularly Uganda. WFP is providing food for the newly arriving refugees. Despite the challenges, the WFP team had provided food assistance to around 220,000 people by the first week in February, and is reaching more people every day – including both those sheltering in UNMISS bases, and people who have fled to more remote, hard-to-access areas. WFP is updating its emergency response plan, aiming to provide food assistance to some 1.3 million people over the next five months, a reflection of the degree to which the conflict has affected the country’s overall food security, especially in the states of Jonglei, Unity and Upper Nile.

South Sudanese refugees cross the border into the adjumani district in Uganda and are received at the Nyumazi refugee camp wjhere they receive food assistance from WFP.

 All photos: WFP/Tine Frank

South Sudan: Families Who Fled Conflict Now Return To Devastated Homes

The crisis in South Sudan has forced more than 700,000 people to flee their homes in search of safety. The UN World Food Programme has so far provided food assistance for around 250,000 displaced people, and is working to extend more assistance to people we can reach outside UN peacekeeping bases, including those who are returning to devastated towns like Bentiu in Unity State.

Photos: WFP/Challiss McDonough

Qamishli, Al Hassakeh, Syria, 03 February 2014



The conflict in Syria continues to impact the humanitarian situation resulting in significant humanitarian needs.  
Access to basic needs including food, water, electricity and medical supplies has been interrupted in areas witnessing armed activities. A growing number of main breadwinners have become unemployed and soaring food and fuel prices across the country have also exacerbated the situation.



In Al-Hassakeh, lack of access by road is not only disrupting humanitarian deliveries but also market supply chains, resulting in a critical shortage of yeast which threatens to halt bread production. Bread is an essential part of the Syrian diet. WFP provides yeast to bakeries in Hassakeh governorate, where yeast shortages led to disruptions in bread supply.  In addition to wheat flour, cycle availability for needy families.

Using commercial airfreight, WFP is airlifting 10mt of yeast from Lattakia. The yeast will be channeled to functioning bakeries in Qamishly which will produce bread for approximately 85,000 vulnerable people in the city. 



In the photos: the yeast provided by WFP is channeled to functioning bakeries in Qamishly.

Photos: WFP/Hussam Al Saleh