Here’s what rising food prices mean for a woman named Shukanti Bisoi, who sells peanuts in the Bhubaneshwar market in northwest India.
Shukanti says that people aren’t buying peanuts like they used to because, with prices being so high, they have to spend their money on more filling staples like rice.
So she’s making less money than she used to, which is bad news for her family. She’s now struggling to keep her kids in school and will have to make some tough decisions in order to make ends meets. 
But Shukanti’s not alone. She’s now buying less of the things that other people sell to make a living, which means they’re in trouble too. 
Meanwhile, food prices are higher than normal, which means that people like Shukanti now have less money to spend on more expensive food.
That, in a nutshell, is what makes food prices such a tricky issue. To find out more, see “High Food Prices: 10 Questions Answered”
Photo by WFP/ Radhika Srivastava

Here’s what rising food prices mean for a woman named Shukanti Bisoi, who sells peanuts in the Bhubaneshwar market in northwest India.

Shukanti says that people aren’t buying peanuts like they used to because, with prices being so high, they have to spend their money on more filling staples like rice.

So she’s making less money than she used to, which is bad news for her family. She’s now struggling to keep her kids in school and will have to make some tough decisions in order to make ends meets. 

But Shukanti’s not alone. She’s now buying less of the things that other people sell to make a living, which means they’re in trouble too. 

Meanwhile, food prices are higher than normal, which means that people like Shukanti now have less money to spend on more expensive food.

That, in a nutshell, is what makes food prices such a tricky issue. To find out more, see “High Food Prices: 10 Questions Answered”

Photo by WFP/ Radhika Srivastava