Hungr In The News

Food Insecurity In Pakistan Rises To 58%, National Nutritional Survey —News Pakistan

According to a survey conducted by National Nutritional Survey in 2011, almost 58% of Pakistanis are food insecure. A WFP representative said, “The situation has gone from bad to worse especially in Sindh where malnutrition and food insecurity among women and children has increased.”

Syria Battles Food Security IssuesThe Wall Street Journal 

Syria is struggling to afford and secure ample food supplies for its domestic population as the European Union’s ban on oil imports puts severe strain on the country’s finances. “The prolonged unrest is often causing disruptions in food distribution channels, leading to localized shortages in several markets,” according to FAO. 

10 Easy Ways to Give Back in the New Year —Shine From Yahoo

Don’t have the extra cash or time to max out your karmic potential? Read our charity cheat sheet - a roundup of 10 easy ways to pay it forward. Give back and goof off with a Web game instead. Free Rice donates rice to WFP for right answers

Malnutrition Widespread In Indian Children, Report Finds –-The New York Times

Roughly 42% of all Indian children under age 5 suffer from malnutrition, a sobering reminder of the persistence of poverty and hunger in the world’s largest democracy, according to a major report released on Tuesday. The extensive food subsidy program that India already operates allocates grain and kerosene to the poor. 

To Create Food Security In Africa, Focus On The Value Chain –-Newstime Africa

The tragic famine in Somalia has once again focused concern on food security in Africa. There are many facets to this issue, and many solutions. While there is a role for relief in addressing food insecurity, the only real solutions center on development. 

Welcome to Karamoja. Cattle are king in this pastoralist region of northern Uganda. As communities here struggle with high rates of malnutrition and hunger, families prize their cattle. Young boys often skip school to keep a close eye on them.
We’ve found that a warm meal gets kids to school and keeps them there. In Karamoja, every school child gets at least one WFP meal a day. By going to school, kids can be at the forefront of new solutions to hunger for their communities. And well-fed children learn better.
Our work in Karamoja highlights how unlocking childhood hunger has the potential to transform communities. From health to hunger to sanitation, Karamoja faces its fair share of challenges. We think, however, that filling a red cup and making sure kids have the nourishment to learn is an excellent place to start.
Photo Copyright: WFP/Marc Hofer

Welcome to Karamoja. Cattle are king in this pastoralist region of northern Uganda. As communities here struggle with high rates of malnutrition and hunger, families prize their cattle. Young boys often skip school to keep a close eye on them.

We’ve found that a warm meal gets kids to school and keeps them there. In Karamoja, every school child gets at least one WFP meal a day. By going to school, kids can be at the forefront of new solutions to hunger for their communities. And well-fed children learn better.

Our work in Karamoja highlights how unlocking childhood hunger has the potential to transform communities. From health to hunger to sanitation, Karamoja faces its fair share of challenges. We think, however, that filling a red cup and making sure kids have the nourishment to learn is an excellent place to start.

Photo Copyright: WFP/Marc Hofer

Hungr In The News

Kenya: Famine Concerns As Dry Season Starts In JanuaryallAfrica.com

There are concerns over hunger as the country enters what is traditionally the driest season on the calendar. According to a report by the Ministry of Agriculture, although food security is improving, poor families are not off the hook yet. 

UN Launches $3M Food Program In Urban AfghanistanMedical Daily

WFP will contribute $3 million dollars towards a project to help the urban poor cope with high food prices. About 18,900 households including some 113,000 individuals, mostly poor women and households headed by the disabled will benefit from the project. 

Yum CEO Writes Book, Will Give Proceeds To Fight Hunger —Business First

David Novak, CEO and chairman of Yum! Brands Inc. shares his tips for effective leadership in “Taking People With You: The Only Way to Make Big Things Happen.” All of Novak’s proceeds from sales will be donated to WFP, in conjunction with Yum’s global hunger relief efforts.

Pepsi Tweet Explained: Street King Nabs Honickman DistributionBevnet

Pure Growth Partners’ co-founder Chris Clarke has lent some context to business partner Curtis “50 Cent” Jackson’s Twitter message that his company had signed a deal for Pepsi to distribute Street King energy shots. As part of the brand message, the company says it will “feed a hungry child” with a donation to WFP with the sale of every shot. 

New Food And Agriculture Organisation Chief Pledges To Prioritise AfricaThe Guardian

The new director general of FAO has indicated that Africa will be his priority at a time of limited resources. Graziano da Silva, who played an important role in Brazil’s successful “zero hunger” initiative, argued the key to improving food security in Africa was the political will to eradicate hunger.

Fighting Disrupts Humanitarian Operations In South SudanThe Guardian

UN officials estimate more than 20,000 people have fled into the bush after an outbreak of violence between two tribes in Jonglei state in South Sudan over accusations of cattle rustling. 

Red Cross: 150 Children Lose Contact With Parents While Fleeing Massive South Sudan Violence —The Washington Post

Red Cross volunteers are trying to reconnect 150 young children with their missing parents after tens of thousands of residents of South Sudan ran into the bush while fleeing a massive wave of tribe-on-tribe violence, an official said Tuesday. 

These orphaned children received food from WFP after a humanitarian mission arrived in the violence-stricken town of Pibor in South Sudan’s Jonglei State (on Tuesday 3 January). Attacks by marauding gangs of youths have driven thousands of people from the locality into the bush where they remain in urgent need of humanitarian assistance.
Photo by WFP/Rehan Zahid

These orphaned children received food from WFP after a humanitarian mission arrived in the violence-stricken town of Pibor in South Sudan’s Jonglei State (on Tuesday 3 January). Attacks by marauding gangs of youths have driven thousands of people from the locality into the bush where they remain in urgent need of humanitarian assistance.

Photo by WFP/Rehan Zahid

There’s nothing easy about growing up in Swaziland, a country mired in poverty and reeling from the HIV pandemic. The relentless spread of the disease has left behind an entire generation of orphaned children for whom hunger is a constant threat.

To help these children, WFP supports programmes that teach them basic farming skills by providing them with food that they can take home to their families.

The courses will help these kids grow up to become successful farmers. In the meantime, they’re also a lot of fun.

In this video, one little girl says she particularly likes working with the chickens, “even though they’re a little naughty.”

Meet Marima and Fatimah. They just finished serving breakfast to hundreds of primary-school kids at the Addis Alem Primary School in Ethiopia.
It’s sometimes hard to understand  why kids like these need a meal at school. Is there no food at home? What about their parents? Here’s how it can happen:
Many of these kids’ families depend on the rainy season to grow food for themselves and their animals. When there’s a drought, there’s less food. Parents sell their livestock or find casual work just to feed their families, and kids start coming to school hungry, unable to learn. Some might leave school altogether to help the family instead.
So school meals make it easier for parents to keep their kids in school. While government “safety nets” give parents food to fall back on, school meals keep their kids learning on a full stomach.
That way, when the next lean season comes around, a lack of rain won’t automatically mean a lack of food.

Meet Marima and Fatimah. They just finished serving breakfast to hundreds of primary-school kids at the Addis Alem Primary School in Ethiopia.

It’s sometimes hard to understand  why kids like these need a meal at school. Is there no food at home? What about their parents? Here’s how it can happen:

Many of these kids’ families depend on the rainy season to grow food for themselves and their animals. When there’s a drought, there’s less food. Parents sell their livestock or find casual work just to feed their families, and kids start coming to school hungry, unable to learn. Some might leave school altogether to help the family instead.

So school meals make it easier for parents to keep their kids in school. While government “safety nets” give parents food to fall back on, school meals keep their kids learning on a full stomach.

That way, when the next lean season comes around, a lack of rain won’t automatically mean a lack of food.

This is Jonathan Dumont (@jonathandumont1), our Emmy-award winning head of video, who spent his Thanksgiving in the West African country of Niger.

During his trip, he went to a village where all the men had left in search of work, and met a woman who said she was headed to the capital to try to make a living “selling sand.”

Needless to say, the people you’ll see in this video at serious risk of going hungry as yet another poor harvest gives way to a foreboding lean season.

And yet, the situation in Niger isn’t hopeless, something Jonathan discovers after stumbling upon something you wouldn’t ordinarily expect to find growing at the edge of the Sahara desert.

At first glance, you might think these kids are having fun at recess. In reality, they are taking one big step for hunger. 
These Australian students from the Coogee Boys Prep School in Randwick Sydney decided to lead a walkathon to help the kids affected by the Horn of Africa crisis. The students called it “Walk for Africa” and set out to raise $20 each.
Ranging from 5 to 12 years of age, these students had more than the usual dose of determination.  In the end, they raised $5,000 for the WFP School Meals program in the Horn of Africa – and proved that we can all take a step to end hunger.
 
 

At first glance, you might think these kids are having fun at recess. In reality, they are taking one big step for hunger.

These Australian students from the Coogee Boys Prep School in Randwick Sydney decided to lead a walkathon to help the kids affected by the Horn of Africa crisis. The students called it “Walk for Africa” and set out to raise $20 each.

Ranging from 5 to 12 years of age, these students had more than the usual dose of determination.  In the end, they raised $5,000 for the WFP School Meals program in the Horn of Africa – and proved that we can all take a step to end hunger.

 

 

Is it a bird? A plane? How about rice?
We bet you’ve never seen rice flying through the air quite like this before. It’s actually part of a shipment of 10,000 tons of Cargill-donated rice being unloaded at the Port of Mombasa. Once unloaded, it will help feed one million hungry people in Kenya.
In support of the ongoing humanitarian crisis in the Horn of Africa, Cargill sourced the grain and managed the ocean transport and logistics to get all that grain to Kenya. WFPUSA raised funds from the American public to support delivering the food from the Mombasa port to the people in need throughout Kenya.
It’s a great example of how partnerships that unite people are transforming our capacity to fight hunger. We can’t all carry 10,000 tons of rice across the globe, but we can each do a little bit. And together that adds up to a lot.
Copyright: WFP/Stephanie Savariaud

Is it a bird? A plane? How about rice?

We bet you’ve never seen rice flying through the air quite like this before. It’s actually part of a shipment of 10,000 tons of Cargill-donated rice being unloaded at the Port of Mombasa. Once unloaded, it will help feed one million hungry people in Kenya.

In support of the ongoing humanitarian crisis in the Horn of Africa, Cargill sourced the grain and managed the ocean transport and logistics to get all that grain to Kenya. WFPUSA raised funds from the American public to support delivering the food from the Mombasa port to the people in need throughout Kenya.

It’s a great example of how partnerships that unite people are transforming our capacity to fight hunger. We can’t all carry 10,000 tons of rice across the globe, but we can each do a little bit. And together that adds up to a lot.

Copyright: WFP/Stephanie Savariaud