Haiti, Port-au-Prince, “Camp l’Aviation” Nutrition Center, November 2012 

Immediately after the earthquake, it was difficult to measure the impact of the catastrophe on children under 5 and on pregnant and lactating women. There was a risk that malnutrition rates could explode. Working with its partners, WFP decided to tackle this problem by adopting an innovative strategy based on prevention and treatment. Blanket distributions of fortified foods designed to combat malnutrition were organized. An independent study done with the support of the Ministry of Health demonstrated that this approach helped Haiti avoid a nutritional crisis in the aftermath of the earthquake. More than a year later, nutrition interventions are ongoing. Pregnant and lactating women, as well as children under 5 receive fortified foods, such as fortified peanut paste and corn soya blend, along with oil and sugar, to treat malnutrition.

First and third photo: Photo: WFP/Marcela Ossandonavetikian

Middle photo: Photo: WFP/Jean Max Saintfleur

Hungr In The News

Haiti -Two Years Post Earthquake: What You May Not KnowThe Huffington Post 

Before and since the earthquake in 2010, Haiti has faced great challenges - ones they are working to confront and to lead the international community in helping them solve.

Rio+20 Can Make A DifferenceThe Guardian 

Rio+20 can and must make a difference. But there is no prospect of achieving the breakthroughs we need on climate change, poverty or in other areas without global agreement. We need to compel our leaders to unite to tackle common problems.

This is what it looks like to win a battle against hunger. On the left is Michael, a severely malnourished child from Haiti. On the right is Michael again, just four months later.
Find out more about how Michael won
Photo by WFP/Stephanie Tremblay

This is what it looks like to win a battle against hunger. On the left is Michael, a severely malnourished child from Haiti. On the right is Michael again, just four months later.

Find out more about how Michael won

Photo by WFP/Stephanie Tremblay

Hungr in the News

At Least 1 Million Zimbabweans Facing Hunger —AP

The U.N. World Food Program said Monday that families are already skipping meals during the “lean season” expected to end with the March harvest. It says the worst affected areas are in the driest parts of Zimbabwe and are expected to again face poor harvests.

Médecins sans Frontières Book Reveals Aid Agencies’ Ugly Compromises —The Guardian 

A controversial new book produced by one of the world’s best-known aid agencies, Médecins sans Frontières, lifts the lid on the often deeply uncomfortable compromises aid organisations are forced to make while working in conflicts.

Seeds of Progress in Mali —The Guardian

Before the construction of their communal warehouse, the seed producers of Falema village would travel miles to sell their goods. It is a scenario that has kept many smallholder farmers in Mali locked in poverty.

The Key Ingredients to Tackle Food Crisis —The Guardian

Increasing agricultural productivity in Africa and removing trade restrictions are our best hope for feeding the planet. A G20 agriculture ministers meeting in Paris in June agreed to resist the use of any restrictions adversely affecting efforts of the World Food Programme (WFP) to feed the hungry. 

The Emergency the World Forgot —Newsweek

After this year’s floods—despite some level of response from local NGOs, young Pakistani activists, relief workers, and the U.N.—aid inflows remain dangerously inadequate and relief workers warn of an impending catastrophe due to unmet pledges and a potential looming breach in the relief-and-food supply line to victims in the difficult months ahead.

Kids in Haiti are heading back to school this week. Please join us in wishing them a great school year!

Kids in Haiti are heading back to school this week. Please join us in wishing them a great school year!

Tags: haiti school