WFP Delivers Food to Conflict-Affected Areas of Northern Mali

In mid-May, a surge in violence in the north of Mali, particularly in the region of Kidal, led to the temporary displacement of thousands of people; further complicating an already difficult situation for vulnerable people in the area.

In spite of ongoing hostilities and the fact that NGOs have been pulling staff from the region, WFP has continued to get food and nutritional support to vulnerable people in Gao and Kidal every month since March of 2013 –and continues to do so today.

With the approach of the lean season, WFP had already planned to increase distributions in the Kidal region. Following the recent clashes, WFP further increased its caseload to account for 4,000 displaced people and is now delivering provisions to 31,000 people, up from 20,000 in April.

WFP-Mali’s Emergency Operation, which provides food and nutritional support to the most vulnerable and conflict-affected people in Mali’s North, is facing a significant funding shortfall. At just one-third funded, WFP was forced to make the difficult choice to cut food rations in order to reach as many people as possible.

Thanks to generous contributions from donors, as of June, 2014, WFP has been able to raise rations back to normal levels in time for the lean season.

Photos: WFP/Daouda Guirou 

Without further funding, this situation will not be sustainable for long. 

Mali, October 2012

Severe drought caused by failure and uneven distribution of rainfall and prolonged dry spells in 2011 led to a delayed planting season, resulting in a sharp drop in agricultural production and reduced food availability.  About 4.6 million people are currently estimated to be at risk of food insecurity in Mali due to the food and nutritional crisis and the crisis in the North.  Internally displaced persons (IDPs), due to conflict, are estimated at 173,950 across the country (Protection Cluster, August 2012) and Malians having taken refuge in neighbouring countries are estimated at 261,624 (OCHA bulletin 14 August). WFP is intervening in the eight regions of Mali with the implementation of food assistance, nutritional and resilience building interventions.

Ambidedi (about 50 km from Kayes)

WFP in Mali aims to reach 229,250 beneficiaries trough prevention of moderate acute malnutrition for children 6-23 months and for pregnant and lactating women (PLW) and 93,220 beneficiaries for treatment of moderate acute malnutrition children 6-59 months and PLW.

The programme delivers supplementary food depending on different the nurtirional status:

Prevention of moderate acute malnutrition for children 6-23 months. Beneficiary children receive satchets of Plumpy’Sup (46g/day) for 250 kcal/pers/day.

Prevention of moderate acute malnutrition for pregnant and lactating women. Beneficiary women receive oil (20g/day) and supercereal (250/day for ) for 1,200 kcal/pers/day.

Treatment of moderate acute malnutrition for children 6-59 months. Beneficiary children receive Plumpy’Sup (92g/day) for 500 kcal/pers/day.

Treatment of moderate acute malnutrition for pregnant and lactating women. Beneficiary women receive oil (20g/day) and supercereal (250/day) for 1,200 kcal/pers/day.

In addition to the prevention programmes WFP is also implementing Food For Work projects aimed and repairing infrastructure such as roads and bridges as well as re-foresting barren lands, re-claiming land for agriculture and constructing dams for the conservation of water for crops and livestock.

Photographs: WFP/Rein Skullerud

Mali, Mopti October 2012
In response to the conflict situation that is taking place in Mali as of the month of may WFP started delivering aid to the populations affected by the crisis in the country. 
Currently WFP is assisting 41,000 IDP’ s in Mopti that have relocated from the north southwards to flee the conflict areas.
WFP is using barges to move the food into the northern regions of the country simply because it has proven the fastest and safest way to enter the rebel held areas of Mali. The barge takes about 48 hours to reach Toumbouctou while by truck the same trip would take several days due to the check points situated along the way.
Barges (Pinace)  are of different sizes and can load between 90 and 30 metric tones, every four or five days four or five barges depart to bring the food to Timbouctou.
There are challenges  mainly for security and accessibility reasons but also due to the  damaged infrastructure otherwise it would be fairly straight forward to drive the commodities to the north where given the tough security situation WFP partners with national NGO’s to provide assistance to the people in need of the and deliver the food,
All photos: WFP/Rein Skullerud
When food security experts talk about the consequences of climate change on the lives of vulnerable people, this is what they mean.
This little girl from Mali and her family are on the move in the wake of yet another hard drought in the Sahel region of Africa which has decimated their sorghum crop. 
Like many other families in this region, they had to pick up and leave in search of greener pastures — a commodity in short supply in this arid region of Africa where rains have become increasingly erratic.
Here is where you can find out how WFP is helping people like this cope with the effects of climate change. 
Copyright: WFP/Daouda Guirou

When food security experts talk about the consequences of climate change on the lives of vulnerable people, this is what they mean.

This little girl from Mali and her family are on the move in the wake of yet another hard drought in the Sahel region of Africa which has decimated their sorghum crop. 

Like many other families in this region, they had to pick up and leave in search of greener pastures — a commodity in short supply in this arid region of Africa where rains have become increasingly erratic.

Here is where you can find out how WFP is helping people like this cope with the effects of climate change. 

Copyright: WFP/Daouda Guirou

Hungr in the News

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Médecins sans Frontières Book Reveals Aid Agencies’ Ugly Compromises —The Guardian 

A controversial new book produced by one of the world’s best-known aid agencies, Médecins sans Frontières, lifts the lid on the often deeply uncomfortable compromises aid organisations are forced to make while working in conflicts.

Seeds of Progress in Mali —The Guardian

Before the construction of their communal warehouse, the seed producers of Falema village would travel miles to sell their goods. It is a scenario that has kept many smallholder farmers in Mali locked in poverty.

The Key Ingredients to Tackle Food Crisis —The Guardian

Increasing agricultural productivity in Africa and removing trade restrictions are our best hope for feeding the planet. A G20 agriculture ministers meeting in Paris in June agreed to resist the use of any restrictions adversely affecting efforts of the World Food Programme (WFP) to feed the hungry. 

The Emergency the World Forgot —Newsweek

After this year’s floods—despite some level of response from local NGOs, young Pakistani activists, relief workers, and the U.N.—aid inflows remain dangerously inadequate and relief workers warn of an impending catastrophe due to unmet pledges and a potential looming breach in the relief-and-food supply line to victims in the difficult months ahead.