With your help WFP can score the Goal of eradicating hunger worldwide within our lifetimes.

 

One of the tools that WFP uses are the school meals projects.

Find out more on our web site: http://www.wfp.org/school-meals?icn=homepage-school-meals&ici=ourwork-link

 

Captions:

Photos 1 and 2:

Democratic Republic of the Congo 12 June 2014

 One school meal is served each day, at 10:30am. The meal is served relatively early because most students come from home without having had breakfast or anything to eat in the morning.

The school meal consists of maize flour, salt and fortified flour. Sometimes rice, peas, and beans are also included. Students from the nearby community will often bring a little of the produce that their families are able to grow to help supplement the meals and make them more tasty. In general, the students really LIKE the food – and you can see this as they eat at lunch time!

Before WFP started providing nutritious school meals at Mwamba, enrolment was not particularly high. Since 2010, the school enrolment has more than DOUBLED. Every year, they actually need to build another classroom to house more students!

You can see the difference in students’ energy levels before and after they eat lunch. Kids are more likely to raise their hands and participate in class, so teachers often work their schedules around the lunch hour ensuring their students have tests, etc. only after they’ve had their meal.

The energy that the school meal provides allows the children to have the energy necessary to learn successfully and to undertake sports such as football.

 

Photos: WFP/Rein Skullerud

 Photo three:

Jordan, Mafraq, Zaatari Camp, November 2012



WFP is providing food assistance to Syrian refugees in camps, transit centres and for families staying with host communities throughout Jordan. During the month of October, WFP transitioned from the provision of hot meals in Zaatari refugee camp in Mafraq Governorate and King Abdullah Park transit centre in Ramtha Governorate to the distribution of dry rations that the refugees can cook themselves. The monthly food basket includes rice, bulgur wheat, pulses (yellow split peas), sugar and salt in addition to a daily bread distribution to the refugees. The camp currently houses some 20,000 Syrian refugees (though this figure changes daily given the arrivals and departures) of which 75 percent are women and children. UNHCR and WFP have set up over 100 communal kitchens around the camp to allow the refugees to prepare their own meals from WFP food basket as per their local taste. This will also diversify the food consumption. 100 more kitchens are still under preparation. WFP continues to provide welcome food packets to new arrivals in Zaatari refugee camp, many of whom have made a long and risky journey to the Jordanian border. Elsewhere in the country, WFP is assisting Syrians living in host communities and plans to reach 250,000 by the end of the year through food vouchers or distributions of food baskets. The conflict in Syria has hit food prices in Jordan. Food exports from Syria have been disrupted and this, together with poor harvests this year in Jordan due to an especially dry and hot summer, have led to a steep increase in vegetable prices. The Jordanian Department of Statistics have recently cited a 32 percent increase in vegetable prices this July as compared to 2011.

Eslam, 9, is Zaatari camp’s Messi. Wearing Barcelona superstar Lionel Messi’s no. 10 shirt, Eslam plays football every day in the camp with his friends and neighbours from Daraa from where they fled. Eslam goes to the camp’s school in the mornings and by noon he begins his daily football match. His team includes both girls and boys.

 



Photo: WFP/Reem Nada

 Photo four:

Cameroon, Lolo, 29 May 2014

 



Almost 90,000 people have fled across the border between C.A.R. and Cameroon since December 2013.
Up to 2,000 people a week, mostly women and children, reach Cameroon through more than 30 entry points along a 700-kilometre stretch of border. Acute malnutrition rates among refugees are between 20 and 30 percent according to WFP and UNHCR screening, well above the emergency threshold of 15 percent.

“Women and children are arriving in Cameroon in a shocking state, after weeks, sometimes months, on the road, foraging for food. This is the most recent tragedy resulting from the escalating bloodshed that has torn C.A.R. apart. We must all act now or more children will needlessly suffer.  We must intervene to save lives and prevent a worsening situation, ” said Cousin. “After they finally escape the danger they faced in C.A.R., children and women who flee  must not die from malnutrition” she added.
WFP has provided 30-day general food rations to 44,700 refugees and stateless people since 22 May.  In response to the grim condition of many new arrivals from C.A.R., WFP began in early May distributing specialized nutritious food at some entry points and refugee sites. Distribution of highly nutritious food to all children under five is underway at Borgop Lolo, Mbile, Gado Ghiti and Kenzu in Cameroon. All pregnant women and new mothers are receiving fortified porridge.

The second of two WFP-chartered aircraft – with a total of 127 metric tons of WFP high energy biscuits and ready-to-eat especially nutritious foods – has arrived in Cameroon today from the UN’s humanitarian hub in Dubai. The first plane arrived in Cameroon on Sunday.
The 90,000 people who have fled into Cameroon are spread over more than 300 sites across 50,000 square kilometres in the East and Adamawa regions. The logistical challenge of reaching them is compounded  by rains and poor roads, which mean that conditions in camps and host settlements are bound to deteriorate.
More than 226,000 refugees and third country nationals have fled violence in C.A.R. since September. Of the refugees 86,068 are in Cameroon, 14,000 in Chad, 14,141 in Democratic Republic of the Congo, and 8,891 in Republic of Congo. All of them are in need humanitarian assistance.
WFP’s operations to help feed the hundreds of thousands or people who have fled C.A.R. to four surrounding countries have an average shortfall of 70 percent or more.

In the Photo: Lolo refugees’ site.  Children start playing again after weeks or months of a terrible journey in the bush to escape violence in CAR.



 

Photo: WFP/Sylvain Cherkaoui

 

 

Yemen, 15 April, 2013

Girls Education Programme

WFP has been operating the Food For Girls’ Education Programme in Yemen since 2007.
Girls who attend school are eligible to receive for each an annual ration from WFP of 150 kg of wheat and eight kg of fortified vegetable oil. It is normally delivered at the school in three separate distributions spaced over the course of the school year.
More than 60 percent of primary school-aged children in Yemen who are not in school are girls. While primary school enrolment rates for boys are 85 percent, they are 65 percent girls. The result is a significant gender gap, reflected in illiteracy rates. Overall, the rate of illiteracy in the country is 41 percent, but it is 60 percent for adult females, compared to 21 percent for adult males.
To address the issue, WFP has been deploying food assistance as a tool to encourage families to send their daughters to school and keep them there. School girls are provided with take-home rations, sufficient to provide nutritional support for a family. The rations are designed to act as incentive for poor families to give their daughters the chance of an education.
The food rations not only help to bridge the gender gap but, indirectly, also address other key challenges—illiteracy, low nutrition and health education, child marriage, maternal/child mortality and high population growth.
“The programme works,” maintains Abdul Wasir Mohamed Al Nuser, principal of the Omar Bin Al Khatab school in a village neighbouring Tawalib. “I would guess that attendance rates for the girls at my school would fall by 90 percent if these rations were terminated.”
WFP evaluations tend to support that view.  One study found that girls’ enrolment and attendance rates in WFP-supported schools grew by more than 60 percent. In some districts, girls’ enrolment even exceeded that of boys.
Despite the benefits, the programme has run into financial problems in recent years. In 2010, funding shortfalls resulted in most of the 86,000 girls targeted receiving one reduced ration instead of the three initially planned. In 2011, WFP was forced to cut almost in half the number of beneficiaries, dropping from 115,000 to 59,000 girls. The numbers fell again in 2012 to 53,000—371,000 beneficiaries in all when families were counted.
Given funding forecasts, WFP is aiming to reach 35,000 school girls during the 2013-2014 school year, 245,000 people overall.

All photos: WFP/Barry Came

 

WFP SENDS FOOD AID TO AL-QUSAYR AND FURTHER UPSCALES ITS EMERGENCY OPERATION FOR SYRIANS

Find out more at: http://www.wfp.org

Download Syria Crisis Interactive Map: http://www.wfp.org/crisis/syria/map

Captions:

First and second photo:

Al-Shadadi district in Al-Hassakeh, northeast Syria, 30 January 2013

Displaced Syrians in Al-Shadadi district in Al-Hassakeh, northeast Syria, wait for WFP food trucks that bring them their monthly food rations. Al-Shadadi, which has been under the opposition’s control for many months now, houses tens of thousands of internally displaced Syrians from neighbouring governorates.

The WFP food box includes rice, bulgur, pasta, vegetable oil, lentils, salt, sugar and canned pulses.

WFP started its emergency operations in Syria in August 2011 and has since distributed over 83,000 metric tons of food to millions of Syrians in over 400 different locations across the country using 5,000 trucks and 55 ships.

Photo: WFP/Abeer Etefa

Third Photo:

Domiz refugee camp, Iraq,  12 March 2013

Ten years after Iraqi refugees fled to Syria to escape the fighting in their country, Syrian refugees have come to the Domiz camp in Iraq in search of food and safety.
WFP is currently assisting some 30,000 Syrian refugees who live in this camp, which continues to swell with new arrivals as the fighting in Syria continues.

Assistance at the Domiz camp has come in the form of food vouchers, which Syrian families can use to buy fresh meat and vegetables at local shops.
The food voucher programme gives refugees the freedom to buy the foods they want, while providing a much needed boost to the local economy in Iraq.
By allowing families to do their own shopping and cooking, the food voucher programme gives families a sense of normality as they wait to return home.

Photo: WFP/Dina El-Kassaby

Fourth Photo:

Jordan, Zaatari Refugee camp April 2013

Sami (husband) and Sahar (wife) fled from Daraa in southern Syria and, after staying for a time in Amman and Egypt, they all arrived in al Zaatari refugee camp in March 2013. They have 10 children, the last of which was born in Zaatari only three weeks ago. Sami was a lawyer in Syria and fairly wealthy. He heads a committee of refugees in the camp. The family receives a ration of fresh bread every day along with the standard WFP dry rations (rice, lentils, bulgar wheat, pasta, salt, oil), which they can cook for themselves. Four of their children (Mohamed, Mahmoud, Ahmed and Rawan) go to one of the schools in al Zaatari and receive WFP datebars  as a mid-morning snack.

Photo: WFP/rein Skullerud

Fifth Photo:

Jordan Zaatari refugee camp, April 2013

Alaa, six years old, one of over 100,000 Syrian refugees living in al Zaatari camp in northern Jordan. Thousands of tents that provide accommodation to refugees in Zaatari camp. It’s in the first area of the camp to be settled, because Alaa’s family came 9 months ago, not long after the camp was built.
Alaa’s family fled nine months ago when fighting intensified and they started hearing stories of children being kidnapped and maltreated. Her Mother Manal says they fled Homs with two suitcases and clothes for 10 days. Her main regret is leaving behind Alaa’s favourite toy, a doll that she used to dress and give baths. Manal cooks as best she can in tent’s kitchen area, using the food supplies provided by WFP along with a few other items, such as coffee, that she manages to find in Zaatari camp. Her home in Homs had a very well equipped kitchen, she says. There are two schools in Zaatari camp. Alaa and her sister gp to one of them, which is run by WFP’s partner agency Unicef. WFP provides snacks for children who come to class. Alaa is in 1st grade and seems to have settled in well since starting at the camp school in October last year, when the classes were in tents. Although she doesn’t have her old friends from Homs, Alaa has made new friends at the school. When in school at around 11.30, just as the class’s concentration starts to waver and stomachs begin rumbling, children are given a nutritious snack. It’s a date bar, fortified with vitamins and minerals, supplied by WFP.
Most children eat their date bars immediately. But Alaa likes to take hers home, to eat in the early afternoon with her mother. Alaa’s parents are keen to ensure their daughter’s education doesn’t suffer as a result of them being refugees. School is also important in the camp because it helps create a sense of normality, a feeling that life carries on.
Alaa is one of around 5,000 children who receive WFP snacks in school every day in Zaatari. Funding permitting, the plan is to expand the programme further by the end of the year.

Photo: WFP/Rein Skullerud

Tanzania, January 2013


The U.S. Ambassador to the UN Food and Agriculture Agencies in Rome, David Lane, has completed a one-week tour of WFP, FAO, IFAD and USAID projects throughout Tanzania. The trip gave him the chance to see firsthand how the U.S. government is working with WFP, IFAD, and FAO to support Tanzanian smallholder farmers, business, and the government in improving the food security situation for the country’s most vulnerable.

Top: Ambassador Lane talks with a District Government official while watching Masaai warriors dance at Arkatan Primary School, Monduli, Arusha, where WFP is providing school lunches to around 500 students.

Bottom left – After touring the warehouse rehabilitated through the Purchase for Progress initiative, Ambassador Lane meets the local farmers. Jikuzeni Kware SACCOS has over 600 members, 285 of whom are women. Each member cultivates between 0.5-3 hectares of land, primarily sunflowers, maize and beans.

 Bottom middle – Ambassador Lane helps out in the weekly food distribution in Sakila Village, where WFP is implementing a Food for Assets project. Food is distributed based on work done by community members on a contouring project, protecting some 200 hectares of land from degradation.

Bottom right – Ambassador Lane helps dish up a nutritious lunch of maize and pulses to students at Arkatan Primary School, Monduli, Arusha.

Photographs: WFP/Jen Kunz

Bangladesh, June 2011

Students who attend the Hat Sarutua Primary School in Sirajganj, Bangladesh. WFP is actively engaged with the government on safety net reforms and is piloting innovative food and cash-based safety nets, such as the Food Security for the Ultra poor (FSUP) project which helps 30,000 ultra-poor women by providing cash grants and training sessions. It also contributes indirectly towards education for girl children. One of the student’s (second from left) mother is an FSUP beneficiary. Prior to becoming a beneficiary, she could not afford education for her daughters. After investing and reinvesting the cash grant received from WFP now she is able to send her daughters to school. 

Photos: WFP/Amy Johansson

Ethiopia, Dolo Ado March 2012

Top:

Somali family at the Buramino camp, one of the five refugees camps forming Dolo Ado where, in total, live 146.000 people. Many families are fleeing due to lack of food in their homecountry, and to the conflict. 

Bottom left:

Meals in the refugee camp schools are provided through the school feeding programs, which are also managed by parents committee. Some of the teachers in Dolo Ado are refugees themselves, trained by humanitarian workers to work in emergency situations.


Bottom right:

Monthly rations of oil, to the refugee camp. A bar-coded ration card is given to each family, for food rations and other relief items. The ration card is a very important document in the camp. Women generally are the ones to go to the distribution centers.

Photos: WFP/Jiro Ose 

Curtis “50 Cent” Jackson (right) speaks with primary school children in the town of Dolow south on the border with Ethiopia. On the left is WFP Deputy Country Director Salman Omer. The children receive a daily in-school snack from the World Food Programme (WFP), which hosted Jackson’s visit to Somalia and Kenya.  Jackson is donating to WFP money from the sales of a new energy drink, called Street King, as part of his public commitment to provide one billion meals for the hungry. For every unit sold, he has pledged to donate 10 U.S. cents, which covers the typical cost of food in a WFP meal.

 Curtis “50 Cent” Jackson also visited the WFP School Meal projects in the Kibera slums of Nairobi and helps serve WFP meals to the children in school.

A full stomach can mean the difference between completing an education and dropping out.  In the poorest districts of Lao PDR, WFP assists more than 152,000 primary school aged children by providing healthy mid-morning meals everyday. Daily nutritious meals in school not only help the children concentrate better in class, it also motivates them to attend school everyday. Click here for more on how they prepare WFP school meals in Lao PDR.

A scene from our school meals programme in the Gaza Strip.
On every school day, these children receive locally produced fortified date bars. By purchasing these date bars locally, WFP supports the local economy.
WFP provides food for around 80,000 children throughout the Occupied Palestinian Territories, helping them grow up healthy and learn in school. 

A scene from our school meals programme in the Gaza Strip.

On every school day, these children receive locally produced fortified date bars. By purchasing these date bars locally, WFP supports the local economy.

WFP provides food for around 80,000 children throughout the Occupied Palestinian Territories, helping them grow up healthy and learn in school. 

Meet Marima and Fatimah. They just finished serving breakfast to hundreds of primary-school kids at the Addis Alem Primary School in Ethiopia.
It’s sometimes hard to understand  why kids like these need a meal at school. Is there no food at home? What about their parents? Here’s how it can happen:
Many of these kids’ families depend on the rainy season to grow food for themselves and their animals. When there’s a drought, there’s less food. Parents sell their livestock or find casual work just to feed their families, and kids start coming to school hungry, unable to learn. Some might leave school altogether to help the family instead.
So school meals make it easier for parents to keep their kids in school. While government “safety nets” give parents food to fall back on, school meals keep their kids learning on a full stomach.
That way, when the next lean season comes around, a lack of rain won’t automatically mean a lack of food.

Meet Marima and Fatimah. They just finished serving breakfast to hundreds of primary-school kids at the Addis Alem Primary School in Ethiopia.

It’s sometimes hard to understand  why kids like these need a meal at school. Is there no food at home? What about their parents? Here’s how it can happen:

Many of these kids’ families depend on the rainy season to grow food for themselves and their animals. When there’s a drought, there’s less food. Parents sell their livestock or find casual work just to feed their families, and kids start coming to school hungry, unable to learn. Some might leave school altogether to help the family instead.

So school meals make it easier for parents to keep their kids in school. While government “safety nets” give parents food to fall back on, school meals keep their kids learning on a full stomach.

That way, when the next lean season comes around, a lack of rain won’t automatically mean a lack of food.