Somalia, October 2013

School meals are at the heart of the World Food Programme’s fight against hunger. Last year, the world’s largest humanitarian agency provided school meals or take-home rations to 24.7 million children around the world. In Somalia, WFP’s school meals are helping to bring children back to class, and this is especially important for girls, who have often been expected to stay at home and help with chores.

In the photo: Girls in the Abdirahman Godyare primary school.

Photos: WFP/Laila Ali

Zaatari, Jordan, 26 March 2013

On the first day of school feeding in Zaatari, Ahmed and his friends receive date bars from WFP and ask, “can we have snacks every day?”.

The World Food Programme is committed to helping Syrian refugees receive their education, that’s why we are providing these mid-day nutritious snacks to students at Zaatari camp schools, giving them the extra boost of energy they need to get the most our of their lessons.

Photos: WFP/Dina El-Kassabi

Ecuador, Carchi, Chalamúas community, Chalamúas community, September 2012

The Campo Elias Bravo School serves the Chalamúas community in the province of Carchi, Ecuador, close to the border with Colombia. Of the thirty-two children attending this school, 40 percent are Colombian or their parents come from Colombia. Many have fled violence to seek refuge on this side of the border. But life goes on: children need to go to school and also to eat in order to be able to concentrate in their studies.

Thanks to a generous gift from Brazil, the World Food Programme delivers its rations to schools in vulnerable areas close to the border. School children have the opportunity to eat a hot meal at lunch that is complemented with fruits and vegetables produced locally by small farmers. Small farmer associations – most of them formed by women - take their produce every Monday to the schools, and parents get organized to help prepare meals for their children. It is important that children are well fed in order to have the energy and enthusiasm to concentrate in classes and also to play.

Children and their families are learning in school about the importance of a good nutrition. Now they know that a dish should be colorful, have carbohydrates, vegetables and proteins. There is something very good in this school: Even though there is no space for an orchard the cooperation of the parents is excellent, and a parent has lent a portion of land for the school orchard. Teachers and children are planting a vegetable garden that will yield products for children’s meals in a short time. That way, their dishes will continue to have many colors along with the white Brazilian rice.

All Photos: WFP/Leonardo Hinojosa

Nepal, Doti district, Basudevi Village, Shree Sitaram Primary School, June 2012

WFP’s strategic priorities in Nepal are to support the country’s protracted peace and recovery process by reducing hunger and undernutrition, fostering increased resilience amongst vulnerable communities, and providing humanitarian response to and preparing for increased environmental disasters. WFP provides 210,000 Nepalese children with a mid-day school meal; cooking oil to 64,000 Nepalese families that keep their girls in school; and mother and child health care to 40,000 women and children.

All Photos: WFP/Deepesh Shresta

Cambodia, Phnom Penh Province, November 2011

Close to 5,000 poor families are receiving cash scholarships this school year in Cambodia under a pilot scholarship programme launched by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports (MoEYS) and the World Food Programme. The pilot is part of the school feeding programme supported by WFP.

The pilot cash scholarship component targets close to 5,000 poor children, who receive $5 per month. MoEYS and WFP, in collaboration with the World Bank, are evaluating the impact of cash and food scholarships, which will also help to inform the design of a national primary school scholarship policy, foreseen in the national Education Strategic Plan for 2013.

All Photos: WFP/Salvador Bustamante Aragones

Tanzania, Longido District of Arusha, April 2012 

WFP Tanzania hosted Ms Kurara Chibana, Japanese model and a Celebrity Partner of WFP, on a visit to one of the schools being supported by Food for Education in the Arusha region of Tanzania. WFP Tanzania is currently providing two school meals a day to over half a million primary school children.

Ms Chibana took part in the filming of Advertising Council Japan’s new nationwide campaign aimed at raising awareness among the Japanese public of WFP’s school meals programme. She visited Engikaret Primary School in the Longido District of Arusha which has been receiving support from WFP since 2002 and is one of 32 schools being assisted in the district.

Photos: WFP/Jen Kunz

Cambodia, March 2012 

Cambodia students receive a breakfast of rice, fish and lentils at Krang Sramar village, Svay Chuk commune, in Samaki Menchey district. The food was donated to the school by the World Food Programme.

Photos: WFP/David Longstreath




Why are these kids all smiles and giggles?  Click here to find out.

Why are these kids all smiles and giggles?  Click here to find out.

Can you imagine cooking for 500 children five times a week? These women do.
Why? Because they believe in laying the foundation for a hunger-free future.
These cooks, who are also parents of children in Tharanikulam Ganesh school in Vavunya, Sri Lanka, prepare healthy WFP school meals for 500 students everyday of the week. By cooking in this school, they also receive take-home WFP food assistance for their families, while their children enjoy attending their classes on a full stomach.
Now that’s what we call supportive moms. 

Can you imagine cooking for 500 children five times a week? These women do.

Why? Because they believe in laying the foundation for a hunger-free future.

These cooks, who are also parents of children in Tharanikulam Ganesh school in Vavunya, Sri Lanka, prepare healthy WFP school meals for 500 students everyday of the week. By cooking in this school, they also receive take-home WFP food assistance for their families, while their children enjoy attending their classes on a full stomach.

Now that’s what we call supportive moms. 

Welcome to Karamoja. Cattle are king in this pastoralist region of northern Uganda. As communities here struggle with high rates of malnutrition and hunger, families prize their cattle. Young boys often skip school to keep a close eye on them.
We’ve found that a warm meal gets kids to school and keeps them there. In Karamoja, every school child gets at least one WFP meal a day. By going to school, kids can be at the forefront of new solutions to hunger for their communities. And well-fed children learn better.
Our work in Karamoja highlights how unlocking childhood hunger has the potential to transform communities. From health to hunger to sanitation, Karamoja faces its fair share of challenges. We think, however, that filling a red cup and making sure kids have the nourishment to learn is an excellent place to start.
Photo Copyright: WFP/Marc Hofer

Welcome to Karamoja. Cattle are king in this pastoralist region of northern Uganda. As communities here struggle with high rates of malnutrition and hunger, families prize their cattle. Young boys often skip school to keep a close eye on them.

We’ve found that a warm meal gets kids to school and keeps them there. In Karamoja, every school child gets at least one WFP meal a day. By going to school, kids can be at the forefront of new solutions to hunger for their communities. And well-fed children learn better.

Our work in Karamoja highlights how unlocking childhood hunger has the potential to transform communities. From health to hunger to sanitation, Karamoja faces its fair share of challenges. We think, however, that filling a red cup and making sure kids have the nourishment to learn is an excellent place to start.

Photo Copyright: WFP/Marc Hofer